Georgia Department of Behavioral
Health and Developmental Disabilities

DUI INTERVENTION PROGRAM WEBSITE

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Teenage Drinking in Georgia:


  • How does Alcohol affect our youth and Georgia’s pockets?
    • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) takes place when a baby is born with a pattern of defects due to the birth mother drinking an enormous amount of alcohol during pregnancy. This often results in facial or neural abnormalities and developmental disabilities. Among teen mothers, fetal alcohol syndrome costs Georgia $29.8 million.
    • Underage drinking cost Georgians $1.5 billion in 2001. This is $1, 832 per year for each teen in the State.
    • Georgia is the 39th highest among the states for the cost of underage drinking due to medical care and loss of work.
    • Young people who drink before they are 15 are 4 times as likely to develop alcohol dependence. They are also 2 ½ times more likely to become abusers of alcohol than those who began drinking at 21.
    • In 2002, 556 youth 12-20 years old were admitted for alcohol treatment in Georgia. This represents 4.3% of all treatment admissions for alcohol abuse in Georgia.
    • Underage drinking is widespread in Georgia. Approximately 369,000 underage youth in Georgia drink each year.
    • In 1993, according to self-reports by Georgia students in grades 9-12: 4
      • 76% had at least one drink of alcohol on one or more days during their life.
      • 32% had their first drink of alcohol, other than a few sips, before age 13.
      • 44% had at least one drink of alcohol on one or more occasion in the past 30 days.
      • 25% had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row (i.e. binge drinking) in the past 30 days.
      • 6% had at least one drink of alcohol on school property on one or more of the past 30 days.
    • In 2001, underage drinkers consumed 13.1% of all alcohol sold in Georgia, totaling $391 million in sales.


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